Setting Seasonal Intentions for the Environment

via National Wildlife Federation

Do you find it hard to make and keep New Year’s resolutions? Try setting a seasonal intention instead!

Use your creativity and science skills to come up with ways you can help the environment. This can be as simple as reducing energy or water use within your own home or a larger-scale river or community clean up. We can all be stewards of the environment on a local or global level — at any age.

Identify 3 ways you can be an environmental steward* and set these as your seasonal intentions. Keep a journal of your adventures, take pictures, make art, or use any other creative method to track your progress. Share your seasonal intentions to inspire those around you. 

Send in images of your activity so we can share it on social media. Email us at info@ogeecheeriverkeeper.org

*Environmental Steward –  Someone who is a responsible user and a protector of the natural environment through conservation and sustainable practices.


This activity can be used as enrichment alongside Project Learning Tree activity “Every Drop Counts.” Every Drop Counts is appropriate for grades 4-8 under science, social Studies and math. The Seasonal Intentions project is appropriate for all ages and incorporates both STEM and art learning concepts. 

Help ORK protect the Ogeechee River from a quarry in Hancock Co.

A company called Mayfield Natural Resources, LLC, has applied for a special use permit to open a new gravel quarry in Hancock Co. Ogeechee Riverkeeper and the citizens in the area have a number of concerns regarding this proposed quarry.

Read ORK’s official Development of Regional Impact comments

Donate to the effort

Sign the petition

In summary:

  • This proposed quarry would pose an everlasting threat to the health of our basin, based on its proximity to Fulsome Creek and the Ogeechee River. Additionally, citizens in the area are reliant on groundwater for drinking.
  • Within a few miles of the proposed site are multiple small businesses in the agricultural and tourism industries that would be negatively impacted by quarry blasting and heavy equipment.
  • Mayfield Properties, a community of 50 low-income families and home to ~150 individuals, is located directly across from the proposed location.
  • The additional infrastructure expenses incurred by the county will add additional expenses and reduce property tax revenue due to depressed property values.
  • These types of quarries have a history of struggling to manage silica dust and sedimentation.
  • There is a lack of information on company’s experience and qualifications in operating gravel quarries.

 

PRESS RELEASE: ORK announces inaugural photography contest

Winners have been announced for the 2020 contest.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
12/2/20
Ogeechee Riverkeeper
Contact: Meaghan Gerard
Communications and Administrative Director
meaghan@ogeecheeriverkeeper.org

OGEECHEE RIVERKEEPER ANNOUNCES INAUGURAL PHOTO CONTEST
Multiple categories will put on a spotlight the beauty of the area

Ogeechee Riverkeeper (ORK) is soliciting the best photographs from across the watershed. Judges will be looking for images that highlight what makes the Ogeechee and Canoochee Rivers, and the surrounding areas, remarkable.

“From the Ogeechee Shoals to the wide estuaries, pine forests to coastal marshes, our watershed is home to an incredible variety of ecological features,” said Meaghan Walsh Gerard, communications director for ORK. “We are also a habitat for more than 160 rare species of plants and animals. By displaying the amazing ecological wealth we have, we hope to inspire more people to protect it.” 

Photographers can enter in multiple categories: Landscape, portrait, wildlife, plant life, underwater, aerial, black and white, and funny wildlife. Since this will be an annual event each December, ORK requests that any images submitted be taken within the same calendar year. ORK hopes to see entries from across the 5,500 square miles of the watershed. 

Complete rules and submission guidelines are available at ogeecheeriverkeeper.org/annual-photography-contest. Submissions are due by December 20, 2020. 

About Ogeechee Riverkeeper: Ogeechee Riverkeeper 501(c)(3) works to protect, preserve, and improve the water quality of the Ogeechee River basin, which includes all of the streams flowing out to Ossabaw Sound and St. Catherine’s Sound. At 245 miles long, the Ogeechee River system drains more than 5,000 square miles of land. More at ogeecheeriverkeeper.org.

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PRESS RELEASE: ORK finds dangerous PFAs chemicals in fish

OGEECHEE RIVERKEEPER FINDS DANGEROUS PFAS CHEMICALS IN FISH
PFAs are carcinogenic ‘forever’ chemicals that bioaccumulate in fish and other organisms consumed by humans

After Ogeechee Riverkeeper (ORK) discovered that Milliken’s Longleaf facility was discharging polyfluoroalkyls and perfluoroalkyls (PFAS) chemicals, ORK initiated a pilot study to determine if these chemicals were bioaccumulating in fish regularly consumed by people from the river. Initial results show that all fish sampled had detectable limits of PFAS chemicals in their tissue fillets. These results are publicly available at ogeecheeriverkeeper.org/milliken. ORK will continue to make results publicly accessible as available. 

These fish were collected between the HWY 80 and I-16 bridges and included representatives from three species (largemouth bass, redbreast sunfish, and bluegill). ORK is continuing the pilot study and will be sampling throughout the watershed. The study will include other species of fish. 

PFAs are a category of manmade carcinogenic chemicals and are considered ‘forever chemicals’ because they do not break down in the environment and they accumulate in wildlife, plants and humans. “The chemicals build up in the fish, and then people eat the fish,” Riverkeeper Damon Mullis explains. “These chemicals have been shown to have many negative health effects, and eating contaminated fish is a pathway for them to enter our bodies.” 

ORK discovered Milliken was discharging these chemicals during an investigation leading up to the facilities’ permit renewal. In 2014, the facility was required to conduct a study to determine if the facility was discharging PFAS chemicals, and if found discharging these chemicals, it was required to perform a fish tissue study to determine the extent of contamination. ORK reviewed the test that was submitted, and accepted by GA EPD, as evidence that the facility was not discharging these chemicals, and determined it was insufficient. ORK now believes the facility has been discharging these chemicals since 2006.  

“These first results came from a relatively small sample,” Mullis said. “But it included three species and it’s enough to show that the chemicals are present and at levels that warrant much more investigation. We need GA EPD to require Milliken to conduct the robust study from a third party that should have been completed in 2014. And they need to do it before they issue a new permit to Milliken. The results of that study should be used to inform the new permit and how PFAS should be regulated in it. The health of the estuary, and the people that consume its fish and shellfish are at stake.”

The public can attend a virtual hearing on Tuesday, November 17, 7 p.m. and is encouraged to submit comments by Friday, November 20, 5 p.m. Links to register for the virtual public hearing and comment submission form are available at ogeecheeriverkeeper.org/milliken.

About Ogeechee Riverkeeper: Ogeechee Riverkeeper 501(c)(3) works to protect, preserve, and improve the water quality of the Ogeechee River basin, which includes all of the streams flowing out to Ossabaw Sound and St. Catherine’s Sound. At 245 miles long, the Ogeechee River system drains more than 5,000 square miles of land. More at ogeecheeriverkeeper.org.

PRESS RELEASE: ORK to hold virtual annual meeting

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
11/9/20
Ogeechee Riverkeeper
Contact: Meaghan Gerard
Communications and Administrative Director
meaghan@ogeecheeriverkeeper.org

OGEECHEE RIVERKEEPER TO HOLD VIRTUAL ANNUAL MEETING
Program will feature updates, raffle, and nature photography

Ogeechee Riverkeeper (ORK) will hold its annual meeting virtually on Friday, November 13, 2020. The live stream will begin at 6:45 p.m., with speakers starting at 7 p.m.

The free program will include gorgeous footage from the most beautiful spots in our watershed, a special message from Georgia Writers Hall of Fame member Janisse Ray, updates on the basin from the ORK board chair and the Riverkeeper, and a raffle full of amazing donated prizes.

Raffle items include an original artwork by Betsy Cain, a private tour of Bootleg Farms, a prize package from the Botanic Garden at Georgia Southern, a handmade wooden cricket box, an adventure from Wilderness Southeast, a custom pet portrait, a two-night stay in downtown Savannah,  a handcrafted wooden paddle, a guided paddle trip, and more. 

Sponsors of the event include Queensborough National Bank and Trust, Advanced Metal Components, Chatham Steel, and Green Truck Pub. Riverrat Productions and Ogeechee River Boat Company are in-kind sponsors.  

Additional information, a link to purchase raffle tickets, and free event registration is available ogeecheeriverkeeper.org/annual-meeting.

About Ogeechee Riverkeeper: Ogeechee Riverkeeper 501(c)(3) works to protect, preserve, and improve the water quality of the Ogeechee River basin, which includes all of the streams flowing out to Ossabaw Sound and St. Catherine’s Sound. At 245 miles long, the Ogeechee River system drains more than 5,000 square miles of land. More at ogeecheeriverkeeper.org.

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